Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Setting up shop: building a fence

My husband and I put in a fence! Neither of us had installed fencing before, so this was quite the adventure. I had considered garden fencing because of the price, but 1) did not want to put upa fence twice, as we would replace it later with something more structurally sound 2) it didn't look as nice as we had hoped fencing might look 3) it was going to be a few hundred dollars for the area I wanted to do. 

So I researched and found wambam fence. Their product line included a vinyl fence with stakes. I thought this was great, because you don't have to dig holes. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any in stock locally or on Amazon. Their prices are considerably lesser than other vinyl fence options, so I chose another product that was available on Amazon prime (free shipping! ) and supposedly easy to put up. 

We did have to dig holes and concrete the bases of each post. Initially, we tried to use a gas powered auger rented from a big box store, but it was difficult and we didn't want to get hurt. So, hand digging it was. It took 2 days to get the holes and concrete set with posts. All of the posts were set at the same height from the floor where they were,  52". My fence has to be 48" in height according to my state regulations for home child care

We used the baseboards to determine where each part would be. Our fence only had 2 1/2 sides, because it is joined by the house and a patio. Even though I measured and re-measured, there is still one post that isn't exactly where we think it should have ended up.  This is because we didn't square off the area with string. Now we know for next time! 

Building the fence took only a few hours on day 3 and I did it by myself. The wambam fence is neat, because it goes together like a large Lego set - that you level off and screw together. Assembling each panel individually also made it easy to step each section, as our yard isn't completely flat. 

 For each panel I slide in the baseboard, put in each spindle, then line up the top board and put each spindle in. That was the hardest part. The are 15 spindles for each panel and they have to stay in place while you level, but before you screw it in. 

No comments:

Post a Comment